Nancy Larrick Crosby

N A T I V E    P L A N T    T R A I L

A Living Field Guide to Virginia Native Plants

image of something to find in native plant trail
Click to see what you can
find in the meadow now.

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 Spring blooming wildflowers, trees and
shrubs are a highlight in the Woodland Section
A gravel path leads visitors through this half-acre area that features plants native to Virginia forests and forest edges. Highlights include early blooming spring ephemeral wildflowers like Bloodroot, Bluebells and Trillium. These flowers are followed by the perennial plant blooms of Violet, Wild Geranium, Wild Blue Phlox and Mayapple. Many woodland trees and shrubs have been planted (Hickory, Serviceberry, Viburnum, Redbud and Oak). The woodland canopy is created by large Hackberry trees that existed prior to the trail being developed.

M E A D O W

Warm season native grasses begin to grow in early summer along the path through the Meadow Section
A gravel path provides a loop trail around the 34-acre meadow that features Virginia native warm season grasses (Big Bluestem, Little Bluestem, Switchgrass and Indian Grass). These grasses begin to green up in early summer and can reach heights of 6 feet when they bloom. Summer and fall native wildflowers (Aster, Goldenrod, Butterfly Weed and Mountain Mint) highlight the area as well. The meadow attracts a variety of wildlife including Bobwhite Quail.

W E T L A N D


The Hewlett Lewis Overlook Pavilion at Rattlesnake Spring Pond in the Wetland Section offers a vantage point for viewing wildlife
Water from Rattlesnake Spring seeps from a nearby rock outcrop to form the half-acre pond in the Wetland Section. This area is the origin of Rattlesnake Run, a tributary of the Shenandoah River. The wetland is home to Spring Peepers, Painted Turtles, Red Wing Blackbirds and many other species of wildlife. The area features a boardwalk and overlook pavilion that provides an excellent vantage point for viewing wildlife.